University: University of Alexandria

Faculty: Faculty of Arts

Department: Department of Greek and Roman Archaeology and Studies, Museum Studies Program,

Course Description

 I. Basic Information

Course code:

Course Title: Introduction to Archaeology

Academic Program: Museum Studies, Obligatory course for students from different backgrounds other that Archaeology or History

Course Type:          Compulsory                                                    Elective

Hours/week: 3     theoretical:  2      practical:  2

Credit Hours: 3

 II. Course Aims

This course aims to:

  • This course begins with an introduction to the general classification of major and minor arts and the fundamental art terminology. It also gives an idea about the making and meaning of art objects. It covers the main aspects of art from the Ancient Egyptian period until the Islamic period
  • It focuses on the relationship between the different forms of art and their historical background. Special attention will be paid to the cultural contacts among different cultural centers at key moments in history.

The course will include site visits to museums and archaeological sites.

1. Intended Learning Outcomes

a. Knowledge and Understanding

After the course, students should be able to know:

  1. Recognize the art of the ancient world (ancient Egyptian art - art in Mesopotamia - Greek art - Roman art - Byzantine art).
  2. Identify the impact and vulnerability in these arts.
  3. Identify the cultural links between ancient civilizations

b. Intellectual Skills

After the course, students should be aware of:

  1. The ability to understand and analyze works of art in their historical and social contexts.
  2.  It helps the student to develop a range of critical and analytical skills.
  3. The student will have personal skills of interpretation.

c. Professional Skills

After the course, students would be able to:

  1. The student will have an idea about the general principles of interpretation and criticism.
  2. It enables the student to understand and appreciate the purpose and function of arts.

It provides the student with good knowledge of the important historical periods and the associated styles and trends of their arts.

d. General & Transferable skills

 

1. Course Contents

Topics covered by this course include:

  - Ancient civilizations.
  - Ancient Egyptian art (architecture - sculpture - painting)
  - Mesopotamian art (Architecture - Sculpture - painting)
  - Syrian Art (architecture - sculpture)
  - Greek art (architecture - sculpture - painting)
  - Roman Art (Architecture - Sculpture - painting)
  - Art in the Christian period
  - Art in the Byzantine era (Architecture - Sculpture - Ivory - painting)
  - Islamic Art

2. Teaching and Learning Methods

  1. A series of digital documents and Internet links form a basic essential toolbox for Museum curators and managers.
  2. Documents: portfolio containing papers of various authors dedicated to the topics of the Course.

 - Museography case studies.

3. Teaching and Learning Methods for Students of Limited Capabilities

- Additional lectures if needed.

- Analyzing case studies

- 5-10 m. revision of previous topics in the beginning of each lecture.

- Discussions.

- Individual activities to get students' feedback.

- Group researches and presentations.

- Distributing handouts of lecture content at the end of each lecture.

4. Students Assessment

a. Assessment methods

-  Power Point Presentations.

-  Writing reports on a given era.

-  Quizzes

-  Written exam

b. Assessment schedule and weight

Assessment

week

% of total mark

Presentation by the students

7

20%

Field Trips

8

20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Exam

15

60%

5. List of References

  1. Core readings:

Adams, L., 1996. The methodologies of art: an introduction. New York, NY: IconEditions.

Beard, M. &John Henderson, J. 2001.  Classical Art: From Greece to Rome. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Frazier, N., 1999. The Penguin concise dictionary of art history. New York: Penguin Reference.

Janson, H.W.  & Anthony Janson, History of Art, Revised Sixth Edition.

Mansfield, Elizabeth, 2002. Art History and Its Institutions: Foundations of a Discipline.Routledge.

Marilyn Stokstad, Art History Revised, Second Edition.

Mason, L., & Stokstad, M., 2002. Art history: study guide. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall.

Minor, Vernon Hyde, 2001. Art History's History, Upper Saddle River: Prentice-Hall.

Nelson, R. S., &Shiff, R., 1996. Critical terms for art history. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Osborne, R. 1998. Archaic and Classical Greek Art. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  1. Suggested readings:

 

  1. Periodicals, websites, etc.

  -

6. Course Matrix for Achievement of Intended Learning Outcomes

Topic

week

Knowledge & Understanding

Intellectual Skills

Professional Skills

General & Transferable Skills

Introduction to the History of Art:

Dimensions of the major historical periods and their basic styles.

Art historical terminology and classification.

1

X

X

X

X

The Art of Ancient Egypt I:

Old kingdom – Middle Kingdom 

2

X

X

X

X

The Art of Ancient Egypt II:

New Kingdom, The Late Period

3

X

X

X

X

The Art of Greece I:

Prehistoric period (Minoan and Mycenaean), Orientalization period, Geometric period, Archaic Period.

4

X

X

X

X

The Art of Greece II:

Early Classical period, Late Classical period.

5

X

X

X

X

Hellenistic Schools of art:

Western kingdoms, Eastern Kingdoms

6

X

X

X

X

Presentations by the students.

7

 

 

 

 

Arts of Graeco-Roman Egypt I:

Ptolemaic Period

Presentations & assignments assessment

8

X

X

X

X

Roman art I:

Etruscan influence on Roman art

Arts of the republican period

9

X

X

X

X

Roman art II:

Arts of the Imperial period in Italy and the provinces.

10

X

X

X

X

Arts of Graeco-Roman Egypt II:

Roman & Byzantine Period

Coptic Art I:

Major Arts

11

X

X

X

X

Coptic Art II:

Minor Arts

12

X

X

X

X

Islamic Art I:

Major Arts

13

X

X

X

X

Islamic Art II:

Minor Arts

14

X

X

X

X

Final Exam

15